Become A Volunteer!
MENU

CMS Student Assignment Survey

February 15, 2016

Screen Shot 2016-02-11 at 4.35.02 PM

A message from CMS Chief of Staff Ernest Winston and the CMS Board of Education:

The Charlotte-Mecklenburg Board of Education invites anyone interested in the success of Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools to help inform future decisions on how students in CMS are assigned to schools. The Board wants to hear what’s important to you and invites you to complete an online student assignment survey. Changes to student assignment would take effect in the 2017-2018 school year.

All citizens, whether or not they have children in CMS, are invited to take the survey, which closes Monday, Feb. 22. The success of our public schools impacts all of us, and the Board wants to develop a thoughtful student-assignment plan that reflects input from people across all areas of Mecklenburg County.

We hope you’ll take the time to share your input. Click here to take the survey or you may access it through the CMS website: www.cms.k12.nc.us. Click on the Student Assignment Survey link at the top of the page. The survey can be taken on any computer or mobile device, and is available in English and Spanish. Paper copies of the survey are also available at every CMS school front office and the Smith Family Center. Individual paper copies in other languages will be made available upon request.

Your opinion is very important to us, and we appreciate you taking time to provide your feedback. If you have any questions or would prefer to complete a paper survey, please contact CMS Chief of Staff Earnest Winston at earnest.winston@cms.k12.nc.us or 980-344-0010.

 

A message from Heart Math Tutoring staff:

Heart tutors, families, school partners, and supporters, thank you for your partnership with Heart and with CMS and for being an important voice in the community!

previous post: Heart Math Tutoring Honors Volunteers at Second Annual HeartThrob Event
This post is in:
Blog
next post: STEM and Workforce Development – A Ticket Out of Poverty